Nasal Hemangioma

September 14, 2005
Youn W. Park, MD

A 21-year-old woman had suffered recurrent nosebleeds and pain in her nose for the previous 2 months. Physical examination revealed an extremely vascular, slowly enlarging intranasal growth on the anterior surface of the septum.

A 21-year-old woman had suffered recurrent nosebleeds and pain in her nose for the previous 2 months. Physical examination revealed an extremely vascular, slowly enlarging intranasal growth on the anterior surface of the septum.

The tumor and surrounding normal mucosa and perichondrium were resected, with the patient under local anesthesia. Nasal packing was applied following closure of the wound.

Nasal hemangiomas occur four times as often in women as in men and are rare before puberty. They arise as polypoid or sessile lesions of the anterior septal mucosa; occasionally, they may develop from the mucosa of the paranasal sinuses.

Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, inflammatory polyp, granuloma gravidarum, and pyogenic granuloma are among the other vascular or inflammatory lesions that need to be considered in the differential diagnosis.

Complete excision of the nasal hemangioma prevents recurrence.