Persistent Vaccine Skepticism Can Erode Clinician Confidence in their Own Recommendations

Patient hesitation about vaccination has been increasing over time in her practice, said Gretchen LaSalle, MD, a family practice physician in Spokane, WA, adding that pushback against COVID-19 immunization was not entirely unexpected.

But she has observed that the persistent rise in vaccine skepticism over time seems to have eroded some pracitioners' confidence that their recommendation for immunization is going to make a difference.

In a recent interview Patient Care© asked LaSalle if there is an antidote for that level of frustration that leads to second-guessing one's clinical efficacy. She answers that question and others in this video.

Part 1. Vaccine Hesitancy: How COVID-19 Changed the Tone, with Gretchen LaSalle, MD

Part 2. Booster Fatigue, Vaccines are for Kids, and Other Obstacles to Adult Immunization in Primary Care

Part 3. "Vaccination is More of a Marathon than a Sprint, so Keep Listening”


Gretchen LaSalle, MD, is a family physician with the MultiCare health system in Spokane, WA, and clinical associate professor for the Washington State University, Elson S Floyd College of Medicine, also in Spokane. LaSalle is a speaker and an author, most recently of the book, Let's Talk Vaccines: A Clinician's Guide to Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy and Saving Lives. She has served as clinical preceptor for the University of Washington MEDEX program and other training programs for physician assistants and nurse practioners.