Author | Yelva Lynfield, MD

Articles

Pressure Alopecia

September 14, 2005

A 50-year-old man had been hospitalized for 27 days, 12 of which he spent comatose, lying on his back. A few days after discharge, he noticed a bald spot on the back of his head. The 2.5 × 3-cm area of alopecia was in the occiput, and the affected portion of the scalp was mildly erythematous.

Fixed Drug Eruption in a Woman With Severe Migraines

September 14, 2005

A 51-year-old woman with severe migraines sought evaluation of a dozen round black macules on her hands, forearms, and legs. A few of the lesions had first appeared 1 year earlier; the remainder had erupted since then.

Linear Verrucous Epidermal Nevus

September 14, 2005

A 7-year-old boy with a history of atopic dermatitis presented with an intensely pruritic linear rash on his upper extremity. His mother reports that the rash has been “growing” despite use of topical corticosteroid creams.

Rheumatoid Nodules in a 65-Year-Old Woman

September 14, 2005

A 65-year-old woman, who was confined to a wheelchair because of severe rheumatoid arthritis, was concerned about nodules that had erupted on her fingers and hands during the previous 3 weeks. Her medical history included colon cancer, chronic renal insufficiency, anemia, and hypertension. The nonpruritic nodules were painful when they began to form under the skin; however, once they erupted, the pain disappeared.

Acrocyanosis in a 12-Year-Old Girl

September 14, 2005

Cyanosis involving the hands and toes of a 12-year-old girl was first noted 3 months before medical evaluation was sought. Her fingers and palms were red, the nail beds were cyanotic, and her palms were cold and sweaty. The girl's toes were cyanotic when she was standing. Her hands and feet reverted to a normal color when the limbs were elevated.

Coexistent Discoid Lupus Erythematosus and Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

May 01, 2003

Bullae had recently appeared on the dorsa of the hands and fingers of a 46-year-old man. His medical history was significant for alcoholism, discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), and hepatitis C. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was ruled out; the patient’s symptoms did not meet the American Rheumatism Association criteria for SLE.