Dislocated Septal Cartilage

September 14, 2005
Kenneth A. Deitcher, MD

Dislocation of the triangular cartilage of the nasal septum is caused by pressure on the nose before and during delivery. It should not be confused with the transient flattening of the nose during birth.

Dislocation of the triangular cartilage of the nasal septum is caused by pressure on the nose before and during delivery (A). It should not be confused with the transient flattening of the nose during birth.

The nasal septum should be returned to its proper position in the septal vomerine groove by the third or fourth day of life. This is a relatively simple procedure done by an otolaryngologist. Failure to relocate the nasal septum may cause fibrosis from hemorrhage at the time of dislocation. Existing ossification centers may be adversely affected, and further distortion of the nose may occur, with marked twisting, cosmetic deformity, and airway obstruction. Some post-reduction edema is still evident in this infant's nose (B).