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Self-monitoring Blood Glucose in T2DM: It's Essential

Slideshow

Self-monitoring of blood glucose is critical for all patients with T2DM and their physicians.The numbers help modify behavior and Rx.

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American Academy of Endocrinology recommend that patients be taught early in treatment how to self-monitor blood glucose (SMBG). Feedback helps patients become aware of the impact of food choices on blood sugar and they tend to be more adherent with treatment plans. For physicians, the patterns revealed by daily recording of SMBG are essential to help fine-tune treatment and specifically insulin therapy. Glucose meter readings plotted for a week will show whether fasting or post-prandial glucose is affecting A1c and direct timing for intensification.Click through these slides for a brief review of the essentials.Content in this portion of Type 2 Diabetes Back to Basics Special Report is based on the AACE/ACE  Clinical Practice Guidelines for Developing a Diabetes Mellitus Comprehensive Care Plan 2015.

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