Strange encounters in Diagnostic Imaging

August 20, 2010

Dr. Brian Witcombe, a consultant radiologist at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, collaborated with Dan Meyer, executive director of the Sword Swallowers' Association International on the study. Interviews with experienced sword swallowers revealed that lower chest pain, often lasting days, followed some performances.

Dr. Brian Witcombe, a consultant radiologist at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, collaborated with Dan Meyer, executive director of the Sword Swallowers' Association International on the study. Interviews with experienced sword swallowers revealed that lower chest pain, often lasting days, followed some performances.

 

A special exhibition explored forensic radiology. Compiled by Prof. Dr. Hermann Vogel, a forensic radiologist at the Institute for Legal Medicine University Hospital Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany, the exhibit shows x-rays of child abuse, injury, body packing of contraband, and other unusual findings.

 

 

Cans were redesigned in the mid-1970s to reduce the risk of accidental swallowing of the tabs. However, the study found 19 children had ingested tabs between 1993 and 2009. The finding is particularly troubling to radiologists because aluminum is extremely hard to see on x-rays compared with other metals, said lead investigator Dr. Lane F. Donnelly, chief of radiology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.