Ambulatory BP Monitoring: Time for an Expanded Role in Office Practice?

December 31, 2006

Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoringis a more accurate predictor of stroke and myocardialinfarction than office BP measurement, according tothe results of the recent Office Versus Ambulatory BloodPressure Study. This prospective trial followed 1963 patientswith treated hypertension for 5 years.

Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoringis a more accurate predictor of stroke and myocardialinfarction than office BP measurement, according tothe results of the recent Office Versus Ambulatory BloodPressure Study. This prospective trial followed 1963 patientswith treated hypertension for 5 years.Key findings. Study participants with a mean 24-hoursystolic BP of 135 mm Hg or higher were almost twice aslikely to have a cardiovascular event.1 Those with a mean24-hour BP lower than 130/80 mm Hg had the same riskof cardiovascular events as normotensive persons.Guidelines for optimal use of ambulatory BP monitoringin clinical practice are outlined in the Algorithm.

References:

REFERENCES:


1.

Clement DL, De Buyzere ML, De Bacquer DA, et al, for the Office VersusAmbulatory Pressure Study Investigators. Prognostic value of ambulatory bloodpressurerecordings in patients with treated hypertension. N Engl J Med. 2003;348:2407-2415.

2.

White WB. Ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring in clinical practice. N EnglJ Med. 2003;348:2377-2378.