Encephalocele

September 14, 2005
Paul E. Lomeo, MD

This 3-year-old child was brought to our ear, nose, and throat clinic for evaluation of the nasal mass that had developed over the previous few months, reports Dr Paul E. Lomeo of Muskegon, Mich. The youngster was known to have congenital problems, including cardiac, renal, and craniofacial anomalies. There was no identified syndrome associated with his health.

This 3-year-old child was brought to our ear, nose, and throat clinic for evaluation of the nasal mass that had developed over the previous few months, reports Dr Paul E. Lomeo of Muskegon, Mich. The youngster was known to have congenital problems, including cardiac, renal, and craniofacial anomalies. There was no identified syndrome associated with his health.

An MRI showed that the red and inflamed nasal mass consisted of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which led to the diagnosis of encephalocele in the nasal tip. This is a rare midline nasal mass that is continuous with the cranium.

Dr Lomeo informs us that the child was referred to a pediatric neurosurgeon for evaluation and surgical intervention. A craniotomy and a resection of the encephalocele were performed, and the defect was reconstructed with a rotational flap. Reports indicate that the youngster is in good health and doing well.