Obesity Overview: 7 Questions on the Latest Research

November 5, 2019

From nut consumption to abnormal bowel habits, test your knowledge of the latest research in obesity with this quick quiz. 

Are you up-to-date with the various obesity studies published last month? Take our 7-question quiz below to find out. 

 

1. Increasing total nut consumption by 0.5 servings/day was found to decrease the risk of obesity by approximately:

A. 3%
B. 7%
C. 10%
D. 15%

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Answer: A. 3%. According to a recent long-term observational study of >144 000 US health professionals published in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health, increasing total nut consumption by 0.5 servings/day was associated with a 3% lower risk of becoming obese (95% CI, 0.96-0.99, P=0.004).

 

2. According to the same study, adults who increased their daily consumption of peanuts specifically by 0.5 servings/day had the lowest risk of developing obesity.

A. True
B. False

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Answer: B. False. Adults who increased their daily consumption of walnuts by half a serving had a 15% lower risk of becoming obese (95% CI, 0.80-0.89), the lowest risk out of all of the nuts included in the study. Eating more peanuts was not associated with obesity risk (relative risk 0.98, 95% CI, 0.96-1.00, P=0.65).

 

3. Severely obese adolescents are less likely to develop acne vs adolescents with a normal body mass index (BMI) by approximately what percentage?

A. 25%
B. 39%
C. 50%
D. 62%

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Answer: C. 50%. A recent study of >600 000 Israeli adolescents, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, found that severely obese (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) adolescents had 50% decreased odds of acne vs those with a normal BMI. Obese adolescents (BMI, 27.5-32.49 kg/m2) had 35% decreased odds of acne and overweight adolescents (BMI, 22-27.49 kg/m2) had 20% decreased odds of acne vs those with normal weight.

 

4. According to the same study, for each 1-unit increase in BMI, male adolescents had a greater decrease in adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of acne vs female adolescents.

A. True
B. False

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Answer: A. True. The study found that for each 1-unit increase in BMI, the aOR of acne decreased by 3.2% in male adolescents (95% CI, 2.9%-3.5%) vs 2.6% in female adolescents (95% CI, 2.3%-3%).

 

5. Approximately what percentage of US adults with chronic diarrhea are overweight, obese, or severely obese?

A. 25%
B. 40%
C. 60%
D. 80%
E. None of the above

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Answer: D. 80%. A recent analysis of a nationally representative sample of the US adult population, published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, found that 80% of adults in the general population with chronic diarrhea are overweight, obese, or severely obese.

 

6. According to the same analysis, adults in which of the following weight categories were the most likely to have constipation?

A. Underweight
B. Normal weight
C. Overweight
D. Obese
E. Severely obese

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Answer: B. Normal weight. The analysis found that 8% of adults who were normal weight had constipation, followed by 7% of overweight adults, 6.3% of underweight adults, 6% of obese adults, and 5% of severely obese adults.

 

7. Which of the following weight cohorts had the highest percentage of US adults with chronic diarrhea?

A. Severely obese
B. Normal weight
C. Underweight
D. Obese

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Answer: A. Severely obese. The Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis also found that the prevalence of chronic diarrhea increases as BMI increases with 11.5% of severely obese adults having chronic diarrhea vs 8.5% of obese adults, 5.3% of overweight adults, 4.5% of normal weight adults, and 3% of underweight adults.

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