Pyogenic Granuloma After Cryotherapy

March 3, 2010

This rapidly growing red papule on the left palm of a 32-year-old man appeared a week after he underwent cryotherapy for wart removal. The patient denied any symptoms and had no significant medical history.

This rapidly growing red papule on the left palm of a 32-year-old man appeared a week after he underwent cryotherapy for wart removal. The patient denied any symptoms and had no significant medical history.

The 1 × 1-cm, erythematous, dome-shaped, easily friable papule was surgically excised. Histopathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma.

This common lesion of the skin and mucous membranes typically appears as a bright red, dome-shaped, papule or polyp with a glistening surface that bleeds easily. These lesions are usually, but not always, preceded by trauma and develop over a few weeks.1 They may occur at any age but are more common in children.

Pyogenic granulomas occur most often on exposed surfaces such as the hands, forearms, and face-sites that are susceptible to trauma.2 They occur more commonly during pregnancy, possibly because of the proliferative effects of estrogens.1 Pyogenic granulomas may also occur in patients receiving capecitabine, indinavir, or acne treatment with isotretinoin.2

Treatment consists of excision with firm and thorough curettage of the base and border. Electrodessication may be necessary to eradicate recurrent lesions or to control bleeding. Patients should be advised of the benign nature of the lesion and the possibility of recurrence.1

References:

REFERENCES:

1.

Hemady N. Growing plantar lesion following trauma.

Am Fam Physician.

2006;74:1173-1174.

2.

James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM, eds.

Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology.

10th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 2006:592.

The views expressed herein are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Air Force, Department of Defense, or the US Government.