• CDC
  • Heart Failure
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Adult Immunization
  • Hepatic Disease
  • Rare Disorders
  • Pediatric Immunization
  • Implementing The Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Weight Management
  • Monkeypox
  • Guidelines
  • Men's Health
  • Psychiatry
  • Allergy
  • Nutrition
  • Women's Health
  • Cardiology
  • Substance Use
  • Pediatrics
  • Kidney Disease
  • Genetics
  • Complimentary & Alternative Medicine
  • Dermatology
  • Endocrinology
  • Oral Medicine
  • Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases
  • Pain
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders
  • Geriatrics
  • Infection
  • Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • Obesity
  • Rheumatology
  • Technology
  • Cancer
  • Nephrology
  • Anemia
  • Neurology
  • Pulmonology

"Allergy Shot" Caveat

Article

What is your opinion of using intramuscular (IM) injections of corticosteroids,such as triamcinolone acetonide, for seasonal allergies?

What is your opinion of using intramuscular (IM) injections of corticosteroids,such as triamcinolone acetonide, for seasonal allergies?
-David Araujo, MD
  Merced, Calif

This practice should be avoided. Intramuscular triamcinolone acetonidecan last for 4 to 6 weeks in the body and can inhibit normal adrenalfunction. If the injection is given in hip fat tissue, it can cause subcutaneousfat necrosis.

Safe and effective low-dose topical nasal corticosteroids are nowavailable for first-line treatment of seasonal allergies. They can be used regularlyto control nasal symptoms for the entire pollen season without the adverseeffects seen with IM triamcinolone acetonide.

-Donald Pulver, Jr, MD
   Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
   University of Rochester
   Rochester, NY

Related Videos
Donna H Ryan, MD Obesity Expert Highlights 2021 Research Success and Looks to 2022 and Beyond
Dapagliflozin slows decline of chronic kidney disease
Primary care physicians should prescribe SGLT2 inhibitors
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.