Basal Cell Carcinoma: Unusual Locations

September 14, 2005
Robert P. Blereau, MD

Basal cell carcinomas, the most common form of skin malignancy, are slow growing and rarely metastasize. They are seen most frequently in men over age 50, and more than 90% occur on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck. Cure rates approach 100%.

Basal cell carcinomas, the most common form of skin malignancy, are slow growing and rarely metastasize. They are seen most frequently in men over age 50, and more than 90% occur on sun-exposed areas of the head and neck. Cure rates approach 100%.

The three cases seen here are interesting because of their unusual locations. The pigmented basal cell carcinoma on the right lower eyelid of a 64-year-old man had been present for 4 years without any noticeable change (A). Shave excision produced excellent cosmetic results. A nodular, centrally pigmented basal cell carcinoma on a 74-year-old man's left nostril (B) was successfully treated by complete excision. An 84-year-old woman had had a nonpigmented basal cell carcinoma on her upper lip for several years, and it was now growing into the columella (C). She refused surgical excision.