Clinical Citations: Do depressive symptoms have an impact on adult asthma outcomes?

September 1, 2005
Volume 5, Issue 9

Studies have indicated that depression occurs more frequently in adults with asthma than in the general population; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between depression and asthma outcomes. A recent study by Eisner and associates revealed noteworthy findings: depressive symptoms appear to be associated with poorer outcomes, including increased risk of hospitalization for asthma.

Studies have indicated that depression occurs more frequently in adults with asthma than in the general population; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between depression and asthma outcomes. A recent study by Eisner and associates revealed noteworthy findings: depressive symptoms appear to be associated with poorer outcomes, including increased risk of hospitalization for asthma.

This prospective observational cohort study included 743 adults who had been hospitalized for asthma. Participants with a score of 16 or more on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were defined as having baseline depression.

The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 18%. Moreover, depression was associated with greater severity-of-asthma scores, poorer asthma-specific quality of life, poorer physical health status, more frequent emergency department visits, and additional hospitalizations for asthma. There was no association between depressive symptoms and recent use of asthma controller therapy.