Deviated Uvula

September 14, 2005
Joe Monroe, PA-C

After 4 days of fever and a very sore throat, an 18-year-old man requested medical treatment. The patient's speech was barely intelligible because of the fullness in his throat. He was able to communicate, however, that he had great difficulty swallowing because of the throat pain and fullness.

After 4 days of fever and a very sore throat, an 18-year-old man requested medical treatment. The patient's speech was barely intelligible because of the fullness in his throat. He was able to communicate, however, that he had great difficulty swallowing because of the throat pain and fullness.

Joe R. Monroe, PA-C, of Vancouver, Wash, writes that examination revealed a left peritonsillar abscess that caused a rightward deviation of the uvula. The abscess was incised and drained; culture of the fluid grew group A β-hemolytic streptococci.

Amoxicillin was prescribed. The patient's recovery was uneventful and the uvula returned to its normal shape.

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