Holocaust Survivors: Lest We Forget

January 1, 2006

The case, in which the authors discuss the tattooing used to identify prisoners in Nazi concentration camps, is especially valuable because many people today have difficulty imagining the magnitude of the horrors of the Holocaust and because the number of survivors still alive is decreasing.

I very much appreciated Dr Henry Schneiderman and Stephanie Johnson's "What's Your Diagnosis?" case of facial edema in a Holocaust survivor (CONSULTANT, September 15, 2005, page 1213) (

Figure

). The case, in which the authors discuss the tattooing used to identify prisoners in Nazi concentration camps, is especially valuable because many people today have difficulty imagining the magnitude of the horrors of the Holocaust and because the number of survivors still alive is decreasing. In addition, as the authors emphasize, there have been other, more recent "holocausts" whose survivors also have special needs.

- Joshua Grossman, MD
   Johnson City, Tenn

We took great pleasure in looking after this very gracious woman. We are grateful to Dr Grossman for articulating some of the key issues about the Holocaust (and other genocidal actions perpetrated by human beings) that underlay our decision to write up and publish this case.

- Henry Schneiderman, MD
   Vice-President, Medical Services/
     Physician-in-Chief
   Hebrew Health Care
   West Hartford, Conn, and
   Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics)
   Associate Professor of Pathology
   University of Connecticut Health Care Center
   Farmington

- Stephanie Johnson Esposito, APRN
   Hebrew Health Care

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