ICAAC: Gardasil Provides Cross Protection Against Wide Array of HPV Types

September 20, 2007

CHICAGO -- Immunization with Gardasil, a vaccine designed to prevent infection with human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16, and 18 may also offer women significant protection against so-called "cousins" of those viral strains, reported researchers here.

CHICAGO, Sept. 20 -- Immunization with Gardasil, a vaccine designed to prevent infection with human papilloma virus types 6, 11, 16, and 18 may also offer women significant protection against so-called "cousins" of those viral strains, reported researchers here.

In clinical trials of more than 9,000 women randomized to vaccine or placebo, there were only 26 cases of precancerous lesions caused by HPV types 31, 33, 35, 52, and 58-all cousins of HPV type 16-compared with 48 such cases among women in the placebo group (95% CI 10 to 68, P

"This really is important information for women," said Scott Hammer, M.D., of Columbia University. "[This] study offers strong support that Gardasil is about 35% to 40% effective in preventing infection with other types of human papilloma virus that cause cancer."

Dr. Brown said that the results of the study should be further encouragement for women and girls to become vaccinated with Gardasil. "My daughter who is 26 has been vaccinated and if the vaccine becomes available for men and boys, I will encourage my sons to be vaccinated as well," he said.

Dr. Hammer noted that human papilloma virus is responsible for several diseases specific to men, including penile cancer, and by vaccinating men it would also help to prevent transmission to women.

Dr. Brown said work is under way on potentially breakthrough technology that may allow for a vaccine that would cover all oncological types of human papilloma virus.