Sebaceous Hyperplasia

September 2, 2004
Benjamin Barankin, MD

For 3 years, numerous skin-colored papules had been present on the face of a 59-year-old man. The lesions developed several months after renal transplantation and the start of immunosuppressive therapy.

For 3 years, numerous skin-colored papules had been present on the face of a 59-year-old man. The lesions developed several months after renal transplantation and the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Benjamin Barankin, MD, of Edmonton, Alberta, diagnosed sebaceous hyperplasia-a common, benign disorder of sebaceous glands that is frequently noted in middle-aged and elderly adults. Patients may have one or several asymptomatic yellowish, soft, small (2- to 6-mm) papules on the cheeks, nose, and forehead. The lesions often have a central umbilication, or dell. Sebaceous hyperplasia is usually a clinical diagnosis, although a punch biopsy can help rule out a neoplasm (such as basal cell carcinoma or sebaceous adenoma/carcinoma). A triggering mechanism has not been identified; however, the disorder is more common in immunosuppressed patients following organ transplantation. In the setting of Muir-Torre syndrome- a rare autosomal dominant disorder-the presence of sebaceous neoplasms (such as sebaceous adenoma and sebaceous carcinoma) has been associated with visceral (especially colonic and hematologic) malignancy.1 Treatment of sebaceous hyperplasia is not required but may be desired for cosmesis. Options include electrodesiccation, topical chemicals (bichloracetic acid), excision, cryotherapy, and carbon dioxide laser therapy. This patient did not want treatment.

References:

REFERENCE:


1.

Akhtar S, Oza KK, Khan SA, Wright J. Muir-Torre syndrome: case report of a patient with concurrent jejunal and ureteral cancer anda review of the literature.

J Am Acad Dermatol.

1999;41(pt 1):681-686.

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