Tumors (skin and GI) and Rhabdomyolysis

September 17, 2013

Which of these GI and skin lesions should you worry about most? Is rhabdomyolysis usually the result of infection? See how well you do with this week’s questions. . .

QUESTION 1:



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A 37-year-old woman with many nevi and a strong family history of malignant melanoma had an asymptomatic but irregularly pigmented macule on the right upper arm.

QUESTION 2:

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QUESTION 3:



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QUESTION 4:



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A 60-year-old woman with a past history of many non-melanoma skin cancers had a tender nodule on the left wrist.

QUESTION 5:

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A 73-year-old woman with high fever, altered mental status, fatigue, diffuse myalgia, cough, dysuria, and increased urinary frequency was admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis of septic shock and rhabdomyolysis.

ANSWER KEY:



Question 1. Answer: c

Question 2. Answer: a

Question 3. Answer: a

Question 4. Answer: b

Question 5. Answer: a