Author | Maryjo Cleveland, MD

Articles

A Systematic-and Realistic-Approach to Functional Assessment of Elderly Persons

December 31, 2006

A 74-year-old man comes to your office because his wife and childrenhave noticed that his memory has become mildly impaired. He continuesto work part time in the family business. Recently, however, his daughter has found thathe is making significant errors with clients. For example, he has failed to show up for appointmentsthat he had scheduled, and has set up appointments with clients whom he has already served.Because of errors he has made in client billing, he has turned over the company’s bookkeepingresponsibilities to his daughter.

Strategies for Optimal Care of the Elderly

December 31, 2006

An 84-year-old woman presents with a 3-year history of slowly progressivememory impairment accompanied by functional decline. Thepatient lives alone but has been receiving an increasing amount of support from her 2 daughters,who accompany her to the appointment. The daughters first noticed that their mother was havingtrouble driving. About a year ago, she started forgetting family recipes. She also left food cookingon the stove unattended and burned several pans. Currently, the daughters are providing mealsand transportation, assisting with housework, and doing their mother’s laundry. They have becomeincreasingly alarmed because she takes her medications only sporadically, despite the factthat they fill her pillboxes and call her regularly with reminders. Their chief concern is whether itis safe for their mother to continue to live alone.

Alzheimer Disease: A Commonsense Approach to Evaluation and Management

December 31, 2006

An 84-year-old woman presents with a 3-year history of slowly progressivememory impairment accompanied by functional decline. Thepatient lives alone but has been receiving an increasing amount of support from her 2 daughters,who accompany her to the appointment. The daughters first noticed that their mother was havingtrouble driving. About a year ago, she started forgetting family recipes. She also left food cookingon the stove unattended and burned several pans. Currently, the daughters are providing mealsand transportation, assisting with housework, and doing their mother’s laundry. They have becomeincreasingly alarmed because she takes her medications only sporadically, despite the factthat they fill her pillboxes and call her regularly with reminders. Their chief concern is whether itis safe for their mother to continue to live alone.

Transitional Care: How to Minimize Errors and Maximize Outcomes

November 01, 2006

THECASE:An 84-year-old man with a history of stable angina, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension presents to the emergency department with worsening dyspnea and peripheral edema. Congestive heart failure is diagnosed, and the patient is admitted to the care of a hospitalist. A standard therapeutic regimen, including diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and oxygen, is instituted, in addition to the patient's home regimen of isosorbide mononitrate, glipizide, and amlodipine. The hospitalsubstitutes pravastatin for the patient's atorvastatin. A Foley catheter is inserted by a urologist because of the patient's benign prostatic hypertrophy. The patient complains of insomnia and is given diphenhydramine. His hospital course is otherwise uneventful.

Transitional Care: How to Minimize Errors and Maximize Outcomes

November 01, 2006

An 84-year-old man with a history of stable angina, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension presents to the emergency department with worsening dyspnea and peripheral edema.

Falls: A Preventable Geriatric Syndrome

April 01, 2006

Your elderly patients may not report a fall to you. Unless they are hospitalized for a severe injury, such as a hip fracture or subdural hematoma, many patients do not discuss falls. What constitutes an optimal strategy for evaluation and prevention of falls?

Myalgia in the Elderly: Arthritis . . . or Something Else?

September 01, 2005

An 82-year-old woman complains that for the past 6 months, she has "not felt like herself." Previously, she was very active and energetic; in fact, 9 months earlier, she had vacationed in Hawaii. It now takes all of her energy just to get out of bed.

Strategies to Promote Successful Aging: Part 1, What Patients Can Do

April 01, 2005

What steps can older patients take now to improve their health and quality of life and maintain their independence?