MRSA Prevalence Higher Than Expected

September 15, 2007

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection may be significantly more widespread than previously thought. Investigators analyzed data from more than 1200 county, public, and private health care facilities across the country, including centers for acute care, cancer, cardiac care, pediatric care, rehabilitation, and long-term care.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (Figure) infection may be significantly more widespread than previously thought. Investigators analyzed data from more than 1200 county, public, and private health care facilities across the country, including centers for acute care, cancer, cardiac care, pediatric care, rehabilitation, and long-term care. These data were collected in October and November of 2006.1

On average, 46 of 1000 patients were affected by MRSA. Of those, 34 patients had an MRSA infection and 12 had MRSA colonization. In more than 75% of the patients, MRSA was identified within 48 hours of hospital admission. In most cases, MRSA infection was diagnosed only after signs and symptoms of active infection manifested.

The results of the study were announced by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. The organization says that the findings underscore the need for greater focus on the prevention and control of MRSA infection in all health care facilities.

References:

REFERENCE:


1.

Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. Methicillin-resistant

Staphylococcus aureus

(MRSA) study results. Available at:

www.apic.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ResearchFoundation/NationalMRSAPrevalenceStudy/MRSA_Study_Results.htm

. Accessed August 9, 2007.