Pyogenic Granuloma in a Teenager

December 31, 2006

A 1 X 0.5-cm hemorrhagic, polypoid lesion that had been present for 2 monthson a 13-year-old boy’s left anterior chest was excised. Pathologic examinationconfirmed the diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma.

A 1 X 0.5-cm hemorrhagic, polypoid lesion that had been present for 2 monthson a 13-year-old boy's left anterior chest was excised. Pathologic examinationconfirmed the diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma.Most frequently seen in children and young adults, these benign vascularlesions grow rapidly and commonly erupt on the head, neck, and extremities."Pyogenic" is a misnomer, since no infectious process is involved; most likely,trauma is the cause of these lobular capillary hemangiomas.Spontaneous regression usually occurs within 6 months. Surgical excisionand examination can confirm the diagnosis and rule out a malignancy.Electrodesiccation and curettement may be performed but must be completeto avoid recurrence.(Case and photograph courtesy of Dr Robert P. Blereau.)