“What’s The ‘Take Home’?” at 10: A Renewed Commitment to Medical Education

November 1, 2008

It’s been 10 years since you first started to see our “What’s The ‘Take Home’?” feature every month in CONSULTANT. Our goal then, as it remains today . . . to bring you real-life clinical cases that keep you up-to date on the latest thinking-and that offer a “takehome message” you can put to immediate use in your daily practice.

It’s been 10 years since you first started to see our “What’s The ‘Take Home’?” feature every month in CONSULTANT. Our goal then, as it remains today . . . to bring you real-life clinical cases that keep you up-todate on the latest thinking-and that offer a “takehome message” you can put to immediate use in your daily practice.

For this case series, we are deeply indebted to Dr Ronald N. Rubin, who has served as Series Editor since the inaugural column. Professor of medicine at Temple University School of Medicine and chief of clinical hematology at Temple University Hospital, Dr Rubin is an outstanding teacher. In 2007, he received Temple University School of Medicine’s Great Teacher Award.

Dr Rubin also has extensive experience with case presentations- especially leading review courses for specialty board exams. He has served as program reviewer for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and course director for the American College of Physicians Internal Medicine Recertification Course. As Series Editor of “What’s The ‘Take Home’?”, he has been responsible for selecting and writing up cases as well as marshaling other contributors who have the same dedication to teaching and sensitivity to the needs of busy practicing physicians.

In the spirit of Dr Rubin’s commitment to continuing medical education- and to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of “What’s The ‘Take Home’?”-we are pleased to offer 0.5 hours of Category 1 CME credit, starting with the column on page 947 of this issue. We invite you to read the brief scenario of an elderly man with late-night confusion and hypoglycemia and test your clinical decision-making skills by choosing the next step to take. To earn credit, you’ll need to complete the activity evaluation and posttest online at http://education.CMELLC.com. Your CME certificate will be delivered to you in a Web page for you to print or refer to at a later date through CME LLC’s Personal CME tracker.

I welcome your feedback about this learning activity, and I invite you to e-mail your comments to me at consultantedit@cmpmedica.com.

-- Julie Bowen
Editor