Cherry Angiomas, or Campbell de Morgan Spots

September 14, 2005
Alexander K. C. Leung, MD

,
Edmond K. H. Liu, MD

A 40-year-old man requested evaluation of several cherry-red papules, which he had noticed on the upper part of his trunk for the past 12 months. The eruptions were diagnosed as cherry angiomas, also known as Campbell de Morgan spots.

A 40-year-old man requested evaluation of several cherry-red papules, which he had noticed on the upper part of his trunk for the past 12 months. The eruptions were diagnosed as cherry angiomas, also known as Campbell de Morgan spots.

Drs Alexander K. C. Leung and Edmond K. H. Liu of Calgary, Alberta, tell us that cherry angiomas are particularly common on the trunk of middle-aged and elderly persons. The lesions increase in number and size with time. Histologically, they are angiokeratomas. The term “cherry angioma” is derived from the color of the lesion. Excision of these spots is not medically necessary, but laser surgery may be used if a patient wants them removed for cosmetic reasons.

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