Natal Tooth

September 14, 2005
Robert P. Blereau, MD

This newborn came into the world with a right lower canine tooth. Natal (predeciduous) teeth are present at birth, whereas neonatal teeth erupt within 30 days of birth. Both natal and neonatal teeth are generally primary teeth; they may erupt as a result of vertical displacement of tooth follicles.

This newborn came into the world with a right lower canine tooth. Natal (predeciduous) teeth are present at birth, whereas neonatal teeth erupt within 30 days of birth. Both natal and neonatal teeth are generally primary teeth; they may erupt as a result of vertical displacement of tooth follicles.

Natal teeth occur most frequently at the mandibular central incisor area and are usually mobile. Because of the tooth's gelatinous base, aspiration may occur. The crown may be well formed or yellow, and the enamel portion is hypoplastic. Complications include abrasion on the tongue or opposing gum surface and difficulty in breast-feeding for both mother and child.

This tooth was excised at the gum line with iris scissors. There was no bleeding.