• CDC
  • Heart Failure
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Adult Immunization
  • Hepatic Disease
  • Rare Disorders
  • Pediatric Immunization
  • Implementing The Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Weight Management
  • Monkeypox
  • Guidelines
  • Men's Health
  • Psychiatry
  • Allergy
  • Nutrition
  • Women's Health
  • Cardiology
  • Substance Use
  • Pediatrics
  • Kidney Disease
  • Genetics
  • Complimentary & Alternative Medicine
  • Dermatology
  • Endocrinology
  • Oral Medicine
  • Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases
  • Pain
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders
  • Geriatrics
  • Infection
  • Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • Obesity
  • Rheumatology
  • Technology
  • Cancer
  • Nephrology
  • Anemia
  • Neurology
  • Pulmonology

Radioulnar Synostosis

Article

During a routine preschool examination, it was noted that this 4-year-old boy, who weighed 30.8 kg (68 lb), did not seem to rotate his arms. The child's mother stated that she first noticed this 2 or 3 years earlier but thought it was related to her son's obesity. The youngster appears to function normally; he is able to write and play football and basketball. No other family members are known to be similarly affected.

During a routine preschool examination, it was noted that this 4-year-old boy, who weighed 30.8 kg (68 lb), did not seem to rotate his arms. The child's mother stated that she first noticed this 2 or 3 years earlier but thought it was related to her son's obesity. The youngster appears to function normally; he is able to write and play football and basketball. No other family members are known to be similarly affected.

Radiographic evaluation revealed radioulnar synostosis, an isolated congenital autosomal dominant condition characterized by the osseous union of the proximal ends of the radius and ulna. During embryonic development, the two bones fail to separate. The abnormality may affect one or both arms.

Careful physical examination in infancy will disclose the defect, but most commonly, the diagnosis is made during early childhood when loss of forearm rotation is recognized.

Surgical treatment is reserved for children whose ability to function is moderately to extremely impaired. Osteotomies of the radius and ulna may be performed to rotate the bones into a more functional hand position. Procedures to release the bony union or reconstruct the radial head are usually futile.

This boy adapted and functioned well, with no restrictions on physical activity. Reassurance was the only treatment required.

Recent Videos
New Research Amplifies Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Cardiometabolic Measures Over Time
Overweight and Obesity: One Expert's 3 Wishes for the Future of Patient Care
Donna H Ryan, MD Obesity Expert Highlights 2021 Research Success and Looks to 2022 and Beyond
"Obesity is a Medically Approachable Problem" and Other Lessons with Lee Kaplan, MD, PhD
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.